Vital for "Key Issues"

Key Elements of a Health Workforce Strategy for the Global Health Initiative

In sub-Saharan Africa, a woman is likely to deliver her baby without a skilled birth attendant, making her chance of dying unacceptably high.

For Manuela

Sexual violence is a reality of the developed and the developing world. Globally, one in three women experience sexual violence in their lifetimes.

Why the Global Health Initiative Needs a Health Workforce Strategy

Entering a one-room health clinic in Cambodia’s Pursat Province, I saw a heavily pregnant woman suffering on the dirt floor. A midwife was the lone health worker staffing this rural post.

“What about men?”

On a recent trip to Malawi, I visited the rural community of Matapila outside of the capital, Lilongwe, where a theater group was performing a series of short plays on how couples negotiate sex and make decisions about if and when to have children.

No More Business as Usual: Strengthening Health Sector Human Resources Management

On August 18, I saw these words in front of me: “The ‘competency of HR workers’ is one of seven ‘major obstacles to building a first-class federal workforce’. [. . .] It's not that the human relations professionals are incompetent. They don't have the training or the technology needed to keep up with a quickly changing workplace.”

Child Marriage: What You Can Do Today to Prevent It

The issue of child marriage is pervasive throughout the developing world, and it undermines local and national efforts as well as those by the United States (US) Government to improve women's and girls' education, health, and economic and legal status worldwide.

Talking Technology: It Matters to Health Systems

Building better health systems requires offering health workers—and those who support them—access to the latest technology.

Training Health Workers: We Need Practical and Long-Term Solutions

This month’s Health Affairs issue “Lessons from Around the World” highlights some of the most pressing issues in health systems strengthening and human resources for health.

Preventing AIDS Deaths Need Not Be a Fight: A Health Systems Approach

Whatever the disease or health sector of priority—be it HIV/AIDS, malaria, family planning, labor and delivery, or pneumonia—six components of the health system must be functioning and integrated in order for health impacts to be maximized.

Bottlenecks: Addressing the AIDS Epidemic Through Increasing Human Resources for Health

In a world where over 33 million people are living with AIDS it is imperative to address the human resources for health (HRH) crisis.

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